07/02/2013
Share this story Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

Relationship calculator

522b7274-4046-4139-8139-7172c6555b50

Work out family relationships with our handy calculator.

Explore the most popular baby names of the last 100 years with this interactive graphic.

We’re all familiar with the relationship between our direct line ancestor and ourselves, but the other branches can get a little tangled, and it’s a common query, at family gatherings or when mulling over family history matters, just how one person is related to another. You might know that the person is, for instance, your grandpa’s sister’s daughter, but what does that make her to you and vice versa?

Our handy family relationship calculator will help you work out precisely that – download it here!

How to use the relationship calculator

  • First choose the most recent common ancestor that you share.
  • For your grandpa’s sister’s daughter and you, the common ancestor is your great-grandparent (her grandparent).
  • Visualise that name in the ‘common ancestor’ box.
  • Move your finger along the top row until you find your relationship to the ‘common ancestor’ (great-grandchild).
  • Then move your finger down the left-hand colunm until you find her relationship to the ‘common ancestor’ (grandchild).
  • The point at which the row and column meet show your relationship to each other – ‘first cousin once removed’. 

Did you know?

  • Grand-nieces and grand-nephews can also be termed great-niece/great-nephew.
  • Kissing cousin is a term used for distant relations, but now you have the chart you can be more precise if you wish!
  • The word ‘removed’ indicates how many generations different one person is from another in relation to the common ancestor.

For more on family relationships, read our guide to working out who's who on your family tree.

How much DNA do you share with your ancestors? Check out the consanguinity relationships chart.

Back to "Relationship calculator" Category

07/02/2013 Share this story   Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

Recent Updates

How to find your UK ancestors using adoption records

Do you have an ancestor in your family tree who was adopted? This needn't prove too much of a stumbling block ...


Using Family Tree Analyzer to identify errors on your family tree

FT Analyzer is a free service that allows you to upload a GEDCOM file and have your family tree checked for ...


Stuck on your family history? June Bridges

Stuck on your family history? ...


Stuck on your family history? Elizabeth Jones

Come along to Family Tree Live and get one-to-one expert help from a professional researcher to help solve ...


Other Articles

How to trace Caribbean family history - 'Finding your way home'

It was at his mum’s bedside in intensive care, that Adrian Stone took the first step to tracing his roots. ...


4 free websites to trace Freemason ancestors

Do you have ancestors who were Freemasons? Try these websites to begin researching their lives ...


How family history inspired my writing: from the River Kwai to the Thames

Ann Bennett reveals how she was inspired by her family history to write and publish her novels ...


Free downloads to help you organise & display your family history

These free downloadable family history sheets go with the 10 top family history projects in the April 2019 ...