11/08/2017
Share this story Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

What is family history? The alternative guide

efc957af-e55c-48c3-a0c8-f138b5f09bc0

Our new blog series, by Paul Chiddicks, takes an alternative look at family history and how to approach the subject. It's family history with a twist...

Let me start by introducing myself, my name is Paul Chiddicks, I am 53 and have been researching my own family tree for around 15 years now. I have both a keen interest in my own family history and also military history. I have decided to start this blog to give people some alternative ideas for research, so its kind of family history with a twist.

Over the coming months I will try to illustrate alternative approaches that might help you add to your own personal tree, all of which I have used successfully myself. Today by means of an introduction, we shall start with “What is family History?”.

What is family history?

So what is family history? Is there a right way or wrong way to do this? The short answer is that it’s “your family history”, therefore it’s personal to you and how you pursue it is entirely up to you. So there is no right or wrong way, there are many do’s and don’t’s and obvious pitfalls to avoid whilst carrying out your research and there are plenty of good books and articles online that will cover those pitfalls.

This blog is not about how you carry out your research, it’s more a look at discovering new ideas and avenues of research that maybe you had not thought about or considered before. It’s about personalising for yourself not for others, ultimately it’s whatever you want it to be. Whatever direction your journey takes you is ultimately your choice there should be pressure to conform, be a rebel and follow your own path of discovery!

Genealogy goals?

Should you have and do you need goals? My view is not necessarily so, your research can be like a flowing river taking you on a journey of discovery, so why not dive off on a tangent and follow your instinct and follow one individual on your tree more closely, just because something captures your imagination. As long as you can find your way back, there’s nothing wrong with that.

There are lots of different voyages to be found and over the next few months I will explore and share a few of those with you.

Subjects will include:

  • Google is your friend
  • Join a forum or association
  • Review, review, review again.

I look forward to bringing some fresh ideas to you over the next few months that will hopefully inspire you in your own research and if it unlocks just one door for you then the journey has been worthwhile. Join us in September for part 1 of the series.

Paul Chiddicks

Follow Paul on Twitter and his blog.

Researching the names: Chiddicks in Essex; Daniels in Dublin; Keyes in Prittlewell; Wootton in Herefordshire and London; Jack in Scotland.

 

Back to "Expert blogs" Category

11/08/2017 Share this story   Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

Recent Updates

How-to guide for visiting an archive or record office to find your ancestors

Discover what you need to know before visiting an archive or record office for family history research. ...


Visiting The National Archives in Kew for family history - top tips

Planning a visit to the National Archives to find your ancestors? Read on for some great advice on making the ...


How to use death certificates in family history - 60-second video guide

In our latest genealogy video, Family Tree editor Helen Tovey presents a one-minute guide to using death ...


The Catholic Heritage Archive - how to find Roman Catholic ancestors

The Catholic Heritage Archive at FindMyPast has millions of records on Roman Catholics from Ireland, the UK ...


Other Articles

Who do you think dunnit? Family history in crime fiction

With the mounting interest in family history it’s not surprising that there’s been a growth in crime ...


Genealogy research – a step by step guide to making the most of your family tree, part 5

In part five of our series, genealogy expert Mary Evans offers some suggestions for honing your research ...


How to find birth, marriage, death and census records on FindMyPast

Discover how to search the birth, marriage, death and census records on the FindMyPast genealogy website with ...


Ancestry top ten search tips

Use these top tips from Ancestry to track down missing ancestors and expand your family tree on the Ancestry ...