19/12/2018 Share this story Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

New 9.2 million Alan Turing Institute project set to 'revolutionise research'

e2f90f97-8d78-41ed-90c4-f0e6fbd912e5

The Alan Turing Institute and the British Library, together with researchers from a range of universities, have been awarded £9.2 million from the UKRI's Strategic Priorities Fund for a major new project. ‘Living with Machines’, which will take place over five years.

The project is set to be one of the biggest and most ambitious humanities and science research initiatives ever to launch in the UK.

Living with Machines
 
‘Living with Machines’ will see data scientists working with curators, historians, geographers and computational linguists with the goal of devising new methods in data science and artificial intelligence that can be applied to historical resources, producing tools and software to analyse digitised collections at scale for the first time.
 
In recognition of the significant changes currently underway in technology, notably in artificial intelligence, the project will use the century following the first Industrial Revolution, and the changes brought about by the advance of technology across all aspects of society during this period as its focus point.   
 
The use of historical newspapers
 
Initial research plans involve scientists from The Alan Turing Institute collaborating with curators and researchers to build new software to analyse data drawn initially from millions of pages of out-of-copyright newspaper collections from within the archive in the British Library’s National Newspaper Building, and from other digitised historical collections, most notably government collected data, such as the census and registration of births, marriages and deaths.
 
The resulting new research methods will allow computational linguists and historians to track societal and cultural change in new ways during this transformative period in British history. Crucially, these new research methods will place the lives of ordinary people centre-stage, rather than privileging the perspectives of decision-makers and public commentators.
 
 ‘Living with Machines’ will bring together data scientists and software engineers from The Alan Turing Institute and curators from the British Library as well as computational linguists, digital humanities scholars and historians from universities including Exeter, University of East Anglia, Cambridge and Queen Mary University of London. 
 
Professor Roey Sweet, Director of Partnerships and Engagement at the Arts and Humanities Research Council, said:
“Living with Machines represents a hugely exciting and innovative development in arts and humanities research. The collaboration between historians and data scientists, exploiting the remarkable growth of digital archives, will open up dramatic new perspectives on the well-known story of the industrial revolution and the history of society’s relationship with machines and technology since the eighteenth century.”
 
 
 

News

19/12/2018 Share this story Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

Recent Updates

Who Do You Think You Are? 2019 includes Titanic, Harry Potter & James Bond stars

The celebrities featuring in the 2019 UK season of Who Do You Think You Are? have been announced, with ...


The Peterloo photograph - search for Peterloo descendants event, 8 June

Peterloo 2019 is hosting an event about the search for Peterloo descendants on 8 June 2019 at Manchester ...


More genealogy shows coming up!

Following the success of Family Tree Live 2019 at London's historic Alexandra Palace, the good news for ...


New website for tracing ancestors who lived or worked in China

A unique online research platform has been launched by a team from the University of Bristol to help ...


Other News

25% of soldiers who took part in the D Day landings never spoke about it to family, new research reveals

As the nation prepares to commemorate the 75th anniversary of D-Day on the 6th June, Ancestry has released a ...


Top 50 most amazing moments of the past 100 years revealed

The end of World War II, the first man on the moon and the first organ transplant are among the most amazing ...


Demolition threat to journeymen weavers' houses revealed by The Huguenots of Spitalfields organisation

The Huguenots of Spitalfields organisation has issued a call to members of the public to help secure the ...


civil Partnerships, Marriages and Deaths (Registration etc) Bill 2019 - how will this affect family historians?

The Civil Partnerships, Marriages and Deaths (Registration etc) Bill is due to be signed into law on 26 May ...