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Manchester Histories Festival, 7 to 11 June 2018

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Manchester Histories Festival, celebrating Greater Manchester’s diverse histories and heritage, is returning for its 5th edition over a long-weekend from 7 to 11 June 2018.

This year’s festival weaves Manchester’s vibrant story of what makes it the city it is with some of the key moments in everyone’s history in which Manchester has played a central role. So as a backdrop to the festival and its talks, walks, screenings, performances and more, is the 100th anniversary of the passing of the Representation of the People Act and the 150th anniversary of the formation of the TUC (Trades Union Congress).

Festival highlights

The festival will pull back the curtain on some of the most intriguing, and often overlooked, chapters of Greater Manchester’s histories and will encompass music, film, debate, talks, theatre, walking tours, arts and more.

Throughout the festival there are events taking place in and around Greater Manchester; from Gallery Oldham’s exhibition on votes for women to Bolton Central Library’s dramatisation from the Mass Observation’s Worktown Survey of everyday life in a Lancashire cotton town. Alexandra Park’s Chorlton Lodge will be showing footage of the many vast political rallies it has hosted, whilst Bury’s Met (formerly Derby Hall) will be exploring its own colourful history as both a music venue and formerly a court of law.

Karen Shannon, Chief Executive of Manchester Histories, comments: “2018 is a historically monumental year for Greater Manchester, as the place that gave birth to the suffragette movement and the Trades Union Congress.  So we are placing these at the forefront of this year’s festival as we explore the themes of protest, democracy and freedom of speech to illuminate many of the fascinating parts of our collective heritage, which have led to sea-changes across British society.

“Manchester is a city for all, just as this festival is for all, with the programme designed in a way that there’s something to suit everyone, from young families to avid history enthusiasts. We are offering the opportunity to everyone who lives in, works in, or is visiting Manchester to delve into and discover its stories.”

For full listings visit the festival website.

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