10/05/2017 Share this story Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

Google Streetview helps historian find 'lost' 1930s British cycleways - video report

692f443f-8544-4b69-a265-f987f84979d6

More than 300 miles of 'lost' cycleways in Britain have been discovered by author and historian Carlton Reid, who used Google Streetview to confirm routes found via archive research.

The cycleways discovered by Carlton were installed beside British roads between 1934 and 1940, but were abandoned after the Second World War. Many were surfaced with red concrete, protected cyclists with kerbs and extended for many miles. They were commissioned by the Ministry of Transport and were built on both sides of the arterial roads constructed in the 1930s.

Join the Family Tree community  
Follow us on facebook
Follow us on twitter
Sign up for our free e-newsletter
Discover Family Tree magazine

Carlton used archive sources to identify the likely locations for the cycleways, and then confirmed their existence with Google Streetview.

He is now funding further research with a crowd-funding campaign, 'Let's rescue Britain's forgotten 1930s protected cycleways', which runs until 25 May 2017, and has already raised more than £10,000. Backers get behind-the-scenes access to reports that will be provided to local authorities, Highways England and the Department for Transport.

Carlton said: 'Some of the 1930s-era cycleways I’ve identified are either fully or partially buried, but most are above ground, in full view but they are not recognised for what they are, which is innovative-for-the-time cycle-specific infrastructure that’s more than 80-years-old. 

“The cycleways have been wide and often kerb-protected since they were built, but it was quickly forgotten when and who they were built for.

“I’ve visited some of these cycleways in-the-flesh but the advent of open-access online imagery has meant it's quicker and cheaper to discover them from my desk.”

He has partnered with an urban planner to bring back to life perhaps hundreds of miles of these forgotten cycleways. John Dales of Urban Movement will take Reid’s historical research and use it to show local and national authorities that there’s often plenty of space for cycling – because the space was allocated many years ago.

For more on the campaign, visit the website.

Back to News

10/05/2017 Share this story Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

Recent Updates

The royal train of Tsar Nicholas I

The royal train of Tsar Nicholas I gives us a unique insight into how the Romanovs travelled, taking their ...


Make merry in the month of May

This May Day, village greens up and down the country will be given over to fairs and festivities. Caroline ...


Village WW1 project remembers a lost generation

Discover a new village project to remember and honour 61 of its menfolk who died in the First World War, to ...


Tracing circus ancestors: Q&A with genealogist & book author Steve Ward

As we mark 250 years of the modern circus, learn about the life of the British man credited with 'inventing' ...


Other News

New project will see contemporary artworks installed among the ancient ruins of Herculaneum and Pompeii

Over the next year, two Roman houses - the House of the Beautiful Courtyard at Herculaneum and the House of ...


In the Footsteps of Malins

Ross Barnwell tells us about his upcoming short film entitled 'Beaumont-Hamel' out this July ...


Regent's Park to host pop-up World War I sorting office

Visitors are invited to make a free trip to an ‘interactive’ pop-up WW1 mail sorting office in London's ...


Volunteer opportunities at the Society of Genealogists

The Society of Genealogists has released details of a number of volunteer roles, based either at the ...