15/06/2012 Share this story Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

Bank of England Archive launches online catalogue

c90b0c8a-e344-4bcd-84e1-8524b7c3349c

For the first time researchers from around the world can search the Bank of England’s Archive Catalogue online. More than 56,000 descriptions of records are currently available to search; records that include many named individuals and are therefore an invaluable source for family historians.

The catalogue enables researchers to identify relevant records, although it will not usually reveal specific names because records are not catalogued in this much detail, so a visit to the archive will be necessary to search the records.

The key staff records are House Lists (from 1694) and Salary Ledgers (from 1718), which together give the summary of an employee’s work. Although less extensive, the reports and minutes of the Committee of the Examination of Clerks (1799 - 1939) are a rich source of family history information, often giving details of an applicant’s schooling and work life prior to the Bank. Among other records, the archive holds detailed First World War staff records and records of the employment of porters and messengers (1892-1915). The new ‘Name Search’ is a quick and easy way to learn about senior staff. It contains brief biographies that link to all the relevant records in the catalogue.

For records of Bank customers and individual holders of government stock, there are indexed ledgers dating from 1694 (although customer accounts are not held beyond 1900). These ledgers give details of transactions so are useful for establishing the finances of an individual over time. The indexes to the stock ledgers often include the address and occupation too; however, the ledgers are arranged according to specific stock so researchers will need to know which stock was held in advance. The Bank of England will extracts can help as they detail how stockholders intended their stocks to be disposed of. The majority of these are now held by the Society of Genealogists.

Names may inadvertently appear in other records too, such as court minutes or department files, which researchers are also welcome to explore at the archive. Researchers should note, though, due to Data Protection there is a 100-year closure period on all records containing personal details of individuals.

To view the catalogue, visit http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/CalmView/

Back to News

15/06/2012 Share this story Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

Recent Updates

Skeletons: Our Buried Bones, Leeds City Museum, 22 September 2017 to 7 January 2018

The touring exhibition Skeletons: Our Buried Bones will visit Leeds City Museum this autumn, revealing the ...


RootsTech 2018 registration now open

Registration for the four-day RootsTech conference, to be held in Utah from 28 February to 3 March 2018, has ...


Top baby names in England and Wales - most popular 100 names for 2016 revealed

The 100 most popular baby names in England and Wales for 2016 have been released by the Office for National ...


Launch of Holocaust by Bullets video series

International human rights organisation Umun has released the first in a series of nine videos which tell the ...


Other News

The key that could have saved the Titanic helps guarantee seafarers' futures

A Titanic key which could have saved the ill-fated ship which sank in 1912 is now helping to secure the ...


Explore a WW1 trench at Kensington Gardens in London - free family event

Visitors to Kensington Gardens in London can experience what life was like in a World War I trench, with a ...


Criminal records collection enlarged at The Genealogist family history website

TheGenealogist has enlarged its Court & Criminal Records collection, allowing users to search for black sheep ...


Virtual tour of a London home through the centuries

Enjoy this virtual tour of the interior of London homes, from the 1600s through to the twentieth century, ...