31/08/2018
Share this story Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

53 million indexed electoral registers released by FindMyPast

b4c28225-78e1-4b60-a6d4-25823eeeb626

The genealogy website FindMyPast has today announced the release over 53 million indexed England and Wales Electoral Registers, covering the 1920s and early 1930s.

The release will enable family historians bridge the gap left by the destruction of the 1931 census of England & Wales. Combined with the 1911 census and 1939 register, the release means that Findmypast can allow family historians to trace their ancestors across a period of history that has traditionally been problematic for researchers.

Join the Family Tree community  
Follow us on facebook
Follow us on twitter
Sign up for our free e-newsletter
Discover Family Tree magazine

The new England & Wales Electoral Registers 1920-1932 collection has been created by reprocessing the original documents in order to improve image quality. Findmypast’s has also developed a new process for picking out individual names, allowing this vast bank of records to be searched with greater accuracy than ever before.
 
For the first time, the Registers can now be searched accurately by individual names in a similar way to other indexed collections currently available on the website. Searches will now also cover all of England and Wales and matching records from the registers will feed into hints for all customers with a Findmypast Family tree.
 
What are electoral registers?
 
Electoral Registers are listings of all those registered to vote in a particular area. The lists were created annually to record the names of eligible voters and their reason for eligibility, such as their residence or ownership of a property.
 
Registration for voters in England has been required since 1832 and registers were typically published annually, making them an excellent resource for tracking ancestors between the census years or for uncovering the history of your home or local area.
 
Search the electoral registers at FindMyPast.
 
Electoral Registers are listings of all those registered to vote in a particular area. The lists were created annually to record the names of eligible voters and their reason for eligibility, such as their residence or ownership of a property. Registration for voters in England has been required since 1832 and registers were typically published annually, making electoral registers and excellent resource for tracking ancestors between the census years or for uncovering the history of your home or local area.

(images copyright FindMyPast)

Back to "Useful genealogy websites" Category

31/08/2018 Share this story   Share on Facebook icon Share on Twitter icon Share on Pinterest icon Share on Google Plus icon Share on Linked In icon Share via Email icon

Recent Updates

Charles Booth Poverty Maps of London added to TheGenealogist's Map Explorer

TheGenealogist’s Map Explorer now includes a feature that allows users to access Charles Booth's ...


3 key resources for today's genealogist; what to look for & where to find them

Are you just starting your family history, or wishing to brush up on your online research know-how? Our 3 key ...


How to create a family tree chart

Find out which family tree chart is best for you, whatever stage you’re at with your family history research, ...


Making a Mayflower 400 pilgrimage

Four centuries ago the Mayflower Pilgrims set sail for the New World. Discover must-see places to include ...


Other Articles

Which family tree chart should I use?

Confused about the many different genealogy charts that are available? Here's our expert help! ...


Boris Johnson is related to ten US presidents

New research by Gary Boyd Roberts of American Ancestors explores the family tree of UK prime minister Boris ...


FamilySearch users can now correct name indexing errors

FamilySearch have today (31 July) announced a new facility that allows users to make name corrections to its ...


DNA classes at RootsTech London: guest blog

If you are joining us in London for RootsTech this October, now is the time to start organising your ...